Annual Professional Development Conference

Annual Professional Development Conference

Amplifying Student Voices

January 31, 2022

Deadline to register is Friday, January 21

This year’s conference theme is “Amplifying Student Voices.” The Internationals Network Professional Development Committee representatives helped create this theme so that, amid a time of transition and disruption, we can maintain a focus on what drives our work: the ideas, insights, and ambitions of the young people we serve. The teacher- and staff-led sessions offered this year reflect the theme uniquely and creatively, with topics including community building, translanguaging, coding, relationships, comics, nature writing, social justice and civic engagement, podcasting, aroma science, and collaborating with student activists, among many others!

We’re excited to introduce a new conference format for this year’s event: we’ll have an array of exciting workshops in the morning, and portfolio norming and reflection sessions in the afternoon. These portfolio-focused sessions will be an opportunity for us to build collective understanding of our rubrics and to negotiate how to interpret them through the lens of student work. This collaborative work and discussion is pivotal to the maintenance of our powerful portfolio system, and our discussions will help ensure that it remains a model of effective performance assessment locally and nationally.

To round out our work together, we will also present multiple asynchronous experiences that participants can take advantage of between morning and afternoon sessions.

We look forward to your participation and bringing you an enriching experience.

 

For any questions about the conference, contact Clarissa at clarissa.cummings@internationalsnetwork.org.

Morning Workshops

9:30a – 11:00a ET/8:30a -10:00a CT/6:30a-8:00a PT

All the Ways to Say, "Love": Translanguaging in the Internationals Classroom

How can we use translanguaging pedagogy to amplify student voices and expand the depth and range of experiences students are able to share in the classroom? In this workshop, participants will explore an example ELA project based on bell hooks’ “All About Love.” Using digital artifacts such as Jamboard, Peardeck, Google Slides, and YouTube videos, we will discuss how translanguaging strategies can be leveraged within the classroom to show and teach students the value of the various linguistic as well as personal experiences they bring with them everyday. 

Facilitator(s): Nisa Nuonsy, Keyra Jimenez

Intended Audience: All are welcome!

REGISTER HERE

Alternative Models for SLIFE Support

How can we support and tap into the brilliance and life experiences of our students with interrupted education? In this workshop, participants will learn about how one Internationals school created an alternative developmental literacy class for SLIFE using and adapting curriculum from the NYS Department of Education and CUNY Graduate Center, called Bridges to Academic Success (bridges-sifeproject.com). Participants will be able to view placement assessments and curriculum, as well as explore sample projects created by students. Participants will also discuss, share, and reflect on their own school contexts, and explore alternative scheduling options that best serve our students with with interrupted education. 

Facilitator(s): Amanda Vender

Intended Audience:This workshop is especially suited for ENL teachers, literacy teachers, and administrators, but all are welcome!

REGISTER HERE

Analysis Strategies for Any Content

We’re constantly telling our students to analyze, but what does that actually mean? Analysis something we know when we see it, but it’s difficult to describe, and even harder to teach! In this workshop participants will explore and discuss analysis strategies that are relevant across content areas. Participants will experience the strategies, explore sample student work, and then plan how to implement the strategies in their classes. Participants will leave with 7 analysis strategies that can be used for annotation, discussion, and written work. 

Facilitator(s):Marc McEwan

Intended Audience: All are welcome! 

REGISTER HERE

Aroma of Cultural Diffusion

How can we create a multidisciplinary project that will engage English language learners in history, science, art, math, and English subjects during this disjointed and fast-paced time? Participants will see an example of a hands-on project involving candle making and aromatherapy. With interdisciplinary output, students will be able to appreciate the value of integrating what they’re learning with what they’re experiencing. In the students’ project, olfactory sensations are used to generate qualitative and quantitative data for analysis. Teachers will analyze data based on various student outputs and discuss how this project could be adapted to their own classroom use and aspirations for interdisciplinary research.

Facilitator(s):Kristian Peñas, Nancy Lewandowski

Intended Audience: All are welcome!

REGISTER HERE

Basic Coding For MLLS

How can we use Scratch to teach coding in any discipline? In this workshop, participants will discuss strategies for teaching basic coding to students. Participants will explore the teacher and student sides of Scratch, a program where students can create their own material. Participants will also be introduced to other resources and coding websites that can be used with students, and will have time to practice with and create their own programs using Scratch. Participants will leave with an understanding of how to teach coding to students and how to use coding to enhance student projects. 

Facilitator(s):Lucy Blackford, Sara Said

Intended Audience:Anyone who is new to coding and/or wants to teach basic coding, but all are welcome! 

REGISTER HERE

Building Antiracist Communities through Storytelling

How can we engage all members of our school communities in conversations about race and racism? In the midst of a pandemic, our youth of color have been disproportionately impacted, shedding light to the inequities that have existed long before this time. As educators in NYC schools that serve a majority of young people of color, we cannot ignore the experiences that hurt our youth everyday. In this PD session, our hope is to create a brave space inviting students, teachers and other educators to virtually engage in courageous conversations about race and racism with the hope of creating meaningful conversations leaning into the discomfort that this work yields. Our outcome is to engage and empower voices of communities that have been marginalized and silenced for a long time. 

Facilitator(s): Rakibat Abiola, Sara Said

Intended Audience: All are welcome!

REGISTER HERE

Choices and Voices: A Creative Approach to Assessments

How can we gather feedback from students to tailor our curriculum, outcomes, and PBATs to fit their needs and skills? When we collect and use feedback from students to make decisions about our planning, we allow for our students to feel seen in the curriculum and in what they learn. In this workshop, participants will explore different strategies for collecting feedback from students in order to amplify our projects. In addition, participants will explore past PBATs and look at student samples. 

Facilitator(s):Brendaly Torres

Intended Audience: The examples explored in the workshop will be from a literacy/ENL class, but all are welcome!

REGISTER HERE

College Access Basics

Are you an advisory teacher? A 12th grade teacher? Do students come to you for college application advice? If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, then this workshop is for you! In this interactive workshop, participants will explore the basics of college counseling. Participants will learn discuss the college application process, explore preconceptions about college access, analyze trends in college access and persistence across the the NYC Internationals Network, and generate ideas for how to support students as they navigate their post secondary plan. Participants will leave with more tools to push students to own their college application process and journey. 

Facilitator(s): Khalia Joseph

Intended Audience: All are welcome!

REGISTER HERE

Creative Solutions

Can creativity be taught? Creativity is an essential skill for future careers, and it can indeed be cultivated and encouraged in students. In this workshop, participants will explore strategies for helping students develop their creativity, and discuss how creativity is related to empathy. Participants will all discuss how to plan projects that allow students the opportunity to first decide which problems need to be solved, and to then come up with a creative solution. 

Facilitator(s):Michele Hamilton

Intended Audience:This workshop is especially relevant for 11th and 12 grade teachers, but all are welcome!

REGISTER HERE

Discovering Central Ideas and Literary Devices in Popular Music

How can we use music to support students in developing literary analysis skills while also elevating student voice and choice? In this workshop, participants will explore an ELA project that uses music to teach about central ideas and literary devices. The project culminates in a group share where students play some of their own chosen music, explain the central idea in the song, and discuss how it is developed. During the workshop, participants will engage in example activities and discuss how they help students explore and practice literary analysis skills. Participants will leave with ideas not only for preparing students for the Part 3 essay on the Common Core ELA Regents, but also for how to incorporate student voices and to give students the opportunity to share something meaningful to them. 

Facilitator(s):Michele Hamilton

Intended Audience: This workshop is most suited for ELA teachers, but all are welcome!

REGISTER HERE

Exploring Trauma Awareness in Classrooms

How can we build trauma awareness as educators, and better understand the impact of trauma on our students, our community, and ourselves? In this workshop, participants will develop and reflect on a working definition of trauma-awareness based on their experiences as educators and from student perspectives. The workshop will serve as a space and opportunity to explore trauma awareness in the classroom, and to explore resources to further investigate trauma-awareness. As well, participants will discuss anonymous student perspectives, and reflect on how these perspectives can be incorporated into and inform teacher practice. 

Facilitator(s):Kholood Qumei, Areum Kang

Intended Audience: All are welcome!

REGISTER HERE

Hey Listen Games: Teaching With Games

Welcome to the Hey Listen Games: Teaching With Games Workshop! Video games and tabletop games are rife with educational potential, but are very rarely implemented in our classrooms in meaningful ways. This workshop will focus on how “entertainment” games that our students are already playing can be utilized as educational resources. This workshop will tap into many of our students’ background knowledge regarding games. As most of our students play games in some capacity, bringing games into the classroom aids in their ability to access new content, skills, and language. Participants will leave with a large number of potential activities and lesson plans to start teaching with games in their classes. 

Facilitator(s): Zach Hartzman, Areum Kang

Intended Audience:This workshop is especially suited for Social Studies, ELA, and Advisory teachers, but all are welcome!

REGISTER HERE

Let the Students Lead!: Collaborating with Student-Activists

Are students at your school looking for ways to take action and fight for social justice? In this workshop, we will hear from student and staff co-facilitators of the FIHS Dream Team about their experiences advocating for immigrant justice, racial justice and mental health support in our school. We will give an overview of how the Dream Team was first founded at FIHS, the types of workshops and partnerships we’ve created, and how we’ve adapted to meet the shifting needs of our community. We will share four examples of student-led workshops from the past two years: a town hall in response to the murder of George Floyd, a workshop on Anti-Asian racism, a series of mental health support groups, and a community circle reflecting on violence against Palestinians and Islamophobia worldwide. 

Facilitator(s):Roxie Salamon-Abrams, Nataly Rojas, and Student Facilitators

Intended Audience: All are welcome!

REGISTER HERE

Nature Journaling for Growth of Language, Thinking, and Confidence

How can we use nature journals to give students a medium for visualizing their thinking about the world around them, and to improve their communication with one another? In this workshop, participants will explore how to incorporate nature journals into classes across content areas, whether it is science, art, humanities, or math. Nature journals are a place for students to become better artists and writers, as they externalize their internal thinking processes and make them visible to themselves and to others. Nature journals provide a medium where native language, English, and art come together, and give students a means for communicating no matter their English level. Participants will leave with references and resources for teaching with nature journals right away. 

Facilitator(s): Jordan Wolf

Intended Audience: This workshop is especially relevant for teachers of science, writing, and art, but all are welcome!

REGISTER HERE

Participatory Action Research in the Classroom

How can we access students’ lived experiences and empower students to share these experiences in the classroom and in their communities? In this workshop, participants will explore how to combine students’ lived experiences about issues in their neighborhoods with academic research so that they can create PSAs and hold presentations in local community spaces. Participants will analyze numerous examples of student-created documentaries and written reports about issues in their neighborhood. These projects include interviews with community members and community organizations, as well as surveys from their classmates. Participants will leave with ideas for how to tap into student experiences in order to create relevant, meaningful, and actionable student projects. 

Facilitator(s):Alexandra Haridopolos

Intended Audience: All are welcome!

REGISTER HERE

Promoting a Public Pedagogy

How can we create authentic opportunities for students to share their projects with their communities? In this workshop, participants will explore various ways to amplify their school projects in public forums. Participants will analyze a sample project, “Agents of Change,” which involved a student made mural and a public community event. Participants will also have the opportunity to consider their own projects and brainstorm ways in which the project can be integrated into the public. Participants will leave with a “choice board” of ways in which to integrate their project and student voices into the public community. 

Facilitator(s): Melissa Meola Shanahan, Robert Johnson

Intended Audience: All are welcome!

REGISTER HERE

Podcasting To Amplify Student Voice

How can we use podcasts to support students in expressing themselves and communicating with the broader school community? The nature of podcasting amplifies voices that are not often heard in a full classroom, which can be of great benefit to the school community as a whole. Through the process, students develop next-level collaborative skills while brainstorming, sourcing, producing/directing, and editing stories relevant to their interests. In this session, participants will hear examples of student podcasts and have the opportunity to speak with students about their experience. They will then create their own plan to implement podcasting at their school. All are welcome!

Facilitator(s): Tim Ross

Intended Audience: All are welcome!

REGISTER HERE

Scaffolding Student-Led Inquiry

How can we support our students to engage with and investigate their own questions and interests? It can be overwhelming to think about supporting student-led inquiry with 100 different students, especially with students of heterogeneous language and schooling backgrounds. Yet when students develop and pursue their own research, their final work is often much more interesting, personal and important. In this workshop, we will share the processes and scaffolds we have developed to support student-driven projects in 11th and 12th grade history classes. Participants will reflect on how we might use these resources, and any other resources that participants want to share, to structure student choice and voice in projects, so that students have more control over their own learning. 

Facilitator(s):Elisabeth Masback, Alyssa Hughes

Intended Audience: This workshop is especially suited for Social Studies teachers, but all are welcome! 

REGISTER HERE

Social Justice And Civic Engagement: Using CRP To Amplify Students' Voices

How can we design a rigorous and relevant social justice curriculum that engages students? With the rising diversity of the US student population, implementing culturally responsive practices (CRP) has become utmost important for engaging students. It can be challenging, but it is possible to make learning practical, relevant, and meaningful to students’ lives so they are able to connect with what they are learning. Bringing students into conversation about real issues in their local and global communities allows them to explore and develop solutions and to utilize their voices to advocate for social change. In this workshop, participants will discuss culturally responsive practices and how to personalize lessons so that they are relevant to students’ learning. Participants will also explore how to introduce social justice issues to students, and brainstorm issues that students are interested in or passionate about. As well, participants will discuss how to encourage debate and empower students with under-engaged voices, how to encourage diverse perspectives, and how to promote student voice through peer feedback. Participants will leave with numerous ideas for how to design a curriculum to include rigor, relevance, social justice, and civic engagement.

Facilitator(s): Keishia Thorpe

Intended Audience: All are welcome!

REGISTER HERE

The Why And How Of Relationships (Building Authentic Relationships Part 1)

In this workshop we will draw upon a combination of neurobiology and our own personal experiences to build and strengthen our understanding of the crucial role relationships play in learning and resilience. We will identify both obstacles and possibilities for building trust and connection in our classrooms, schools and communities.

Facilitator(s): Ramapo for Children, Sasha Elias

Intended Audience: All are welcome!

REGISTER HERE

Using Games To Build Community

How can we build an academic community in our classrooms so that our students feel a sense of trust and belonging and are more able to take ownership for their own learning? In this workshop, participants will explore many community building strategies and games that get students talking, laughing, and ultimately building close connections with one another. Community building is an on-going process, and there are many routines that we can use to develop strong teacher-student and student-student relationships. When students are given the space to share their concerns and values, they begin to feel their opinions matter. Through laughter, talk, and games, we can support our students in opening up, sharing their feelings, and amplifying their voices.

Facilitator(s): Julie Arcement

Intended Audience: All are welcome!

REGISTER HERE

Using Storytelling to Build Community

In this workshop, we will explore techniques for using live, 1st person narratives to build trust and empathy in the classroom, while also developing student skills of listening, speaking, and analysis. Workshop participants will learn strategies for brainstorming, scaffolding, and telling student stories, so that students can build personal narratives and share with the whole class. 

Facilitator(s):Alex Porter

Intended Audience: All are welcome!

REGISTER HERE

Afternoon Sessions

1:00p-3:00p ET/12:00p-2:00p CT/10:00a-11:00a PT

Building Rapport, Authenticity, And Partnerships (Building Authentic Relationships Part 2)

For those staff not attending norming sessions, we are working with a partner to offer an additional workshop session, which may be of special interest to non-academic school staff. In this workshop we will practice and reflect upon specific practices for building authentic relationships including: listening without an agenda, building rapport, intentional vulnerability and establishing shared goals. In the process we will reflect together upon the identities and experiences we each bring to our relationships and how we locate ourselves and strive for authenticity with young people, colleagues and other community members.

Facilitator(s):Ramapo for Children, Sasha Elias

Intended Audience: Those not attending a norming session, with special emphasis on paraprofessionals and non-academic school staff, but all are welcome!

REGISTER HERE

College Access Basics

Are you an advisory teacher? A 12th grade teacher? Do students come to you for college application advice? If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, then this workshop is for you! In this interactive workshop, participants will explore the basics of college counseling. Participants will learn discuss the college application process, explore preconceptions about college access, analyze trends in college access and persistence across the the NYC Internationals Network, and generate ideas for how to support students as they navigate their post secondary plan. Participants will leave with more tools to push students to own their college application process and journey. 

Facilitator(s): Khalia Joseph

Intended Audience: All are welcome!

REGISTER HERE

ELA Portfolio Norming Session

This year’s afternoon portfolio-focused sessions will be an opportunity for us to build collective understanding of our rubrics and to negotiate how to interpret them through the lens of student work. This collaborative work and discussion is pivotal to the maintenance of our powerful portfolio system, and our discussions will help ensure that it remains a model of effective performance assessment locally and nationally.

Facilitator(s):Leah Pascarella,Sarah Stahl,Myoungmee Monchinski

Intended Audience: All are welcome!

REGISTER HERE

Math Portfolio Norming Session

This year’s afternoon portfolio-focused sessions will be an opportunity for us to build collective understanding of our rubrics and to negotiate how to interpret them through the lens of student work. This collaborative work and discussion is pivotal to the maintenance of our powerful portfolio system, and our discussions will help ensure that it remains a model of effective performance assessment locally and nationally.

Facilitator(s):Pops Singson

Intended Audience: All are welcome!

REGISTER HERE

 

Science Portfolio Norming Session

This year’s afternoon portfolio-focused sessions will be an opportunity for us to strengthen cross-school alignment around our rubrics and to negotiate how to interpret them through the lens of student work. This collaborative work and discussion is pivotal to the maintenance of our powerful portfolio system, and our discussions will help ensure that it remains a model of effective performance assessment locally and nationally. We are offering norming sessions for Science, Social Studies, ELA, and Math.

Facilitator(s): Sevi Vogiazi, Pooja Bhaskar, Martin Pascual

Intended Audience: All are welcome!

REGISTER HERE

Social Justice And Civic Engagement: Using CRP To Amplify Students' Voices

**This workshop is available to participants who do not use the Internationals Portfolio Rubrics for their work**. How can we design a rigorous and relevant social justice curriculum that engages students? With the rising diversity of the US student population, implementing culturally responsive practices (CRP) has become utmost important for engaging students. It can be challenging, but it is possible to make learning practical, relevant, and meaningful to students’ lives so they are able to connect with what they are learning. Bringing students into conversation about real issues in their local and global communities allows them to explore and develop solutions and to utilize their voices to advocate for social change. In this workshop, participants will discuss culturally responsive practices and how to personalize lessons so that they are relevant to students’ learning. Participants will also explore how to introduce social justice issues to students, and brainstorm issues that students are interested in or passionate about. As well, participants will discuss how to encourage debate and empower students with under-engaged voices, how to encourage diverse perspectives, and how to promote student voice through peer feedback. Participants will leave with numerous ideas for how to design a curriculum to include rigor, relevance, social justice, and civic engagement. All are welcome!

Facilitator(s): Keishia Thorpe

Intended Audience: All are welcome!

REGISTER HERE

Social Studies Portfolio Norming Session

This year’s afternoon portfolio-focused sessions will be an opportunity for us to build collective understanding of our rubrics and to negotiate how to interpret them through the lens of student work. This collaborative work and discussion is pivotal to the maintenance of our powerful portfolio system, and our discussions will help ensure that it remains a model of effective performance assessment locally and nationally.

Facilitator(s): Kholood Qumei,Lori Sandler

Intended Audience: All are welcome!

Category(ies): Culturally Responsive-Sustaining Education

REGISTER HERE

Student Portfolio Reflection and Feedback Session

** Please note the time for this session is 1:00p – 2:00p ET/12:00p – 1:00p CT/10:00 – 11:00 PT**

If your school has student leaders who would like to participate in a feedback and reflection session with other young people from across the Internationals Network in order to share their thoughts and opinions about the portfolio process, please contact Clarissa at clarissa.cummings@internationalsnetwork.org by 1/15/22. 

Intended Audience:Internationals Students